Each player progresses through a series of 9 ‘holes’ by throwing darts at a regulation dartboard.  The player with the lowest score at the end of the 9 hole round is the winner.

 

 

Scoring Breakdown:

 

Scoring in Golf Darts follows the scoring system demonstrated in Golf.  Players attempt to score a par or better on each hole.  As in golf, players attempt to achieve the lowest score possible.  The scoring system follows as such:

 

Hole in One: -4 to -2 (The spread on this score depends on the par of the hole the player is shooting on.

Double Eagle: -3

Eagle: -2

Birdie: -1

Par: 0 (often referred to as Even or E)

Bogey: +1

Double Bogey: +2

Triple Bogey: +3

Plus 4: +4

Plus 5: +5

Course:

 

The course centers around a standard dartboard setup. The dartboard hangs so that the bullseye is 5 feet 8 inches (172.72 cm) from the floor, eye-level for a 6-foot (180 cm) person.  

 

The course consists of nine(9) different ‘holes’, each of which have a different Tee Box.  The Tee Box is the starting throwing position on the floor.  

 

Each course must consist of 3 different levels of distance comprising of a short, medium and long range holes.  Each level has three different holes, each starting at their respective Tee Box.

 

The short range holes are referred to as Par 3s and traditional golf scoring for Par 3s are used.

The medium range holes are referred to as Par 4s and traditional golf scoring for Par 4s are used. The long range holes are referred to as Par 5s and traditional golf scoring for Par 5s are used.

 

Although each Golf Dart course is different (like real golf courses) there are standards to create a cohesion of competitiveness across courses.  Differences arise based upon location, visual obstacles, and creator’s control.  Short holes (par 3s) must fall in a range of 96” - 120”.  Medium holes (par 4s) must range from 160” - 200”.  Long holes (par 5s) must range from 224” - 300”.  

 

Creativity on course design is encouraged but the standards on length are to ensure some comparison to other courses and players.

 

Each course must also consist of 3 distinct channels for which a player will progress through the holes.  These three channels are referred to the Right, Left and Center Channel.  The explanation for the Channels is explained in the Gameplay section.  A diagram of a generic course has been provided below.

 

 

Scoring:

 

The ‘hole’ that each player is aiming for is the number of the Tee Box that they are shooting from.  For Example:  If a player is on the 1st Tee Box, they are aiming to hit the 1 wedge on the dartboard.  A player on the second Tee Box aims for the 2 wedge on the dartboard.  A player on the third Tee Box aims for the 3 wedge and so forth up.

 

The score is determined by the players “best” dart.  The “best” dart is the dart that yields the best score for the player.  Any penalty strokes are added on to the “best” dart score to determine the player’s score on each hole.  For example: If a player throws three darts on hole 5 (aiming for the 5 wedge on the dartboard) and one of the darts is in the 5 wedge, but the other two darts are not.  That player receives the score for hitting the wedge and the other two darts are not counted.  

 

Dartboard Scoring Breakdown:

 

The scoring for each hole is consistent throughout the game but realigns with the appropriate wedge corresponding with the player’s Tee Box position.

 

If a player lands a dart in the wedge corresponding with the Tee Box from whence they are shooting, the score is a Birdie (-1).  For example, a player shooting from the 1 Tee Box and whose best dart hits the 1 wedge, the score is a Birdie.

 

If a player’s best dart lands in an adjacent wedge to the Birdie wedge, then they score a Par (0).

 

If a player’s best dart lands in an adjacent wedge to the Par wedge, then they score a Bogey (+1).  

 

If a player’s best dart lands anywhere outside the Birdie, Par, and Bogey wedges, and outside the Bullseye, but on the board, then they score a Double Bogey (+2).  

 

If a player misses the board entirely, they are penalized one stroke (+1) to be added to their best dart score.  If a player’s best dart misses the board entirely, they score a Double Bogey (+2), plus a penalty stroke (+1) for a final score of Triple Bogey (+3)

Penalty strokes are always added at the end of a turn.  They are added to the score of the player’s best dart.  A penalty stroke (+1) is added for each dart that misses the board entirely.

 

For Example: A player who misses the board entirely 3 times on hole five would receive a Double Bogey (+2) score for not hitting any designated wedge for that hole.  They would then receive 3 penalty strokes (one for each dart missing the board) for a total score of +5.

 

Scoring Diagrams for each hole are below:

 

The Rules of Golf Darts

The Bullseye:  

 

If a player manages to hit the bullseye, their turn is immediately over.  Their score is the number of the dart (stroke) minus the par of the hole from which they are shooting.  

 

Example: A player hits the bullseye on his 3rd dart of a Par 5.  His stroke is 3 because it is his third dart and the Par of the hole is 5.  3 (stroke) - 5 (par of hole) = -2 (Eagle).

 

Example 2: A player hits the bullseye on his 1st dart of a par 4.  His stroke is 1 because it is his first dart and the Par of the hole is 4.  1 (stroke) - 4 (par of hole) = -3 (Hole in One)

 

Example 3: A player hits the bullseye on his 1st dart of a par 3.  Hist stroke is, again, 1 and the Par of the hole is 3.  1 - 3 = -2 (Hole in One)

 

Penalty strokes (if incurred) are still added to a player’s hole score even if they hit the Bullseye.

 

Gameplay:

 

Each player moves through the course from Hole 1 to Hole 9.  If multiple people are playing the game, then all players complete the hole before the group proceeds to the next Tee Box.

 

Each hole has a specific amount of “shots” (darts) per Tee Box.  Players get one shot on the Par 3s, two shots on the Par 4s and 3 shots on the Par 5s.  The player must take all of their shots, except when a shot results in a bullseye.  Once a bullseye is hit, the turn is automatically over.  

 

Moving Up:  

 

Much like golf, where a good tee shot results in a closer second shot, players of dart golf have a chance to move closer to the board if they have a good shot.   Concurrent to the scoring breakdown, there are two zones on the board that allow the player to move closer to the dartboard to execute any remaining shots they may have.  

 

If a player’s shot lands in the outer color ring or the outer black and white ring (the outer ring), the player moves up to the Par 4 Tee Box in their respective channel.   If a player’s shot lands in the inner colored circle or the inner black and white circle (the inner ring), the player moves up to the Par 3 Tee Box in their respective channel.  A diagram of the channels is represented below:

 

If a player is already shooting at a Par 4 Tee Box, they can only move up if their shot is within the inner circle.  If their shot lands in the outer circle, since they are already at the Par 4 Tee Box, they don’t gain any advantage and don’t move up.  If a player is shooting from a Par 5 Tee Box and their shot lands in the inner circle, they move all the way up to the Par 3 Tee Box in their respective lane for their remaining two shots.  

 

It is important to know that even though a player may move up by hitting within the inner or outer circle, they still are shooting at the number that corresponds with their original Tee Box.  

 

For Example, if a player begins hole 7 (a par 5) and hits the inner circle.  They would move up to the Par 3 Tee Box within their lane.  In this example that would be the 4 Tee Box.  The player, however, still shoots for the 7 wedge on the dartboard and scores according to their best dart with reference to the 7 wedge.  See graphic below:

 

Miscellaneous Rules:

 

A player may not pass over the line of the Tee Box at any time during their shot.  Their momentum cannot carry their body beyond the Tee Box line even after their shot has left their hand.

 

If a dart strikes the board but falls out, the score of the shot is a (+2) because that shot resting on the ground and is not lodged in any of the scoring wedges.  However, in striking the board, the player is not assessed a penalty stroke for this shot because the shot hit the board initially.

 

A Tournament consists of 4 rounds of 9 holes.  

 

Other types of golf scoring can be played using this scoring structure.  These include match play, and stroke play.

 

 

Have Fun:  Have tons of fun.  This game is super addictive.